Sunday, January 28, 2007

Heart attack survivor talks fact

By TOMIE LUNSFORD
Telegram Staff Writer

The heart attacks a woman differently than it attacks a man.
Though the end results are similar, both genders do not share common symptoms during a heart attack.
That's the message Carol Allred of Harker Heights shared Tuesday night, Jan. 23, with the Bell Chapter of the American Business Women's Association.
Mrs. Allred is a heart attack survivor.
'By the grace of God, I'm here,' Mrs. Allred said. 'There's a payback for that. Educating women is my payback.'

Hispanic Leadership Council names new leader, new goals

By TOMIE LUNSFORD
Telegram Staff Writer

The Temple Chamber of Commerce Hispanic Leadership Council (HLC) announced its strategic plan for 2007 as John Alaniz passed the gavel to Jodi Lane-Vazquez, incoming president.
'Our special project is to reduce teen pregnancy rates this year,' said Alaniz, the council's outgoing president, during the its Jan. 19 meeting.
'The Hispanic Leadership Council calls for abstinence in the youth of our community.'
This statement segued into the introduction of HLC's new partnership with the Scott and White Worth the Wait Program.

Saturday, January 27, 2007

¿Comprende? Language program expands at FBC

By TOMIE LUNSFORD
Telegram Staff Writer

Computer.
Chalkboard.
Neighbor.
Simple. If you know the language like you know the back of your own hand.
But for people learning English, the components of these words are as abstract as algebra's x.
The u in computer sounds like you and ewe, the latter a female sheep, but nothing like the u in your uncle's perturbed public image consultant.
Chalkboard starts with a double-lettered sound of ch as in church. Its ch is quite different from the k-like ch in anchor. That ch steals the sound of k in ankle.
And neighbor's a word full of tricks. The word plagues some native English speakers well into the fifth-grade.
Its nei rhymes with a horse's whiny nay, and the not-so-ghostly gh may as well not be there for the lack of a detectable sound.  

ESL at FBC
Obscure rules, true in one instance but not another, are the topics the novice English speaker must master to communicate effectively.
The English-Second-Language (ESL) program at First Baptist Church (FBC) in Temple helps foreigners achieve that goal. Their livelihood depends on it.

Sunday, January 14, 2007

You're getting sleepy: Professional hypnotist talks about her job

By TOMIE LUNSFORD
Telegram Staff Writer

Eyes are closed.
Her soft German voice guides the imagination.
'You are in a kitchen, your favorite kitchen,' the professional hypnotist said.
Looking around the dining hall at the Howard Johnson Inn in Killeen, every woman's chin rested on her chest with her shoulders slumped.
The 30 women were at the hotel for Thursday night's meeting of the Central Texas area council of the American Business Women's Association (Please, see related story on Page 3B).
But while the voice spoke, the ladies were there to do as the voice commanded.

Precious memories: Alzheimer's patients find favorite items to trigger thoughts of long ago

By TOMIE LUNSFORD
Telegram Staff Writer

The photograph was in a gold frame. A lady in a long, white dress stood beside a man in a black suit.
But Alzheimer's patient Elaine Stevens couldn't find the words to describe her wedding day. The note on the back of the picture read '1949, married in Stillwater, Oklahoma.'
Mrs. Stevens brought her wedding picture to First Lutheran Church for this week's Thursday Club meeting. The week before, co-director Joyce McKinney said all of the patients were asked to bring a favorite object that had special meaning. The program, 'Precious Memories,' was in honor of the club's first-year anniversary/birthday.
'It's a way to unlock memories, a recollection exercise,' Mrs. McKinney said.

Saturday, January 13, 2007

Retired into service

By TOMIE LUNSFORD
Telegram Staff Writer

With a slew of RVs parked in its lot, the First Baptist Church of Troy looks like it might be hosting a carnival or rodeo.
But the two-week guests resemble neither carneys nor cowboys.
The 25 men who call those RVs home are retired teachers, accountants, bankers and lawyers. Instead of slacks and briefcases, they now wear hard hats and overalls with hammers and saws hanging from their belts.
Their wives call them the Hammering Grandpas.
And their nametags say 'Texas Baptist Men Retiree Church Builders (TBMCB) building for the glory of God.' Developed in the late 1960s, the statewide organization has at least 80 members.

Sunday, January 7, 2007

Transferring treasures: Program teaches importance of keeping memories alive

By TOMIE LUNSFORD
Telegram Staff Writer

The list of our treasures goes on forever, but we don't.
After our funerals, the half-decayed ornament that little Billy made the year he lost his first tooth will become an unidentified mass of goo that finds its final resting-place in a Hefty bag.
But our life's bounty deserves a future.
'These things are part of our heritage,' Ilene Miller said Thursday, Jan. 4, to about 20 members of the Housekeepers Club gathered for a meeting at the City Federation Clubhouse in Temple.
'They make us special as families. Otherwise it's just stuff,' she said.